WBUR – Snowy Commute Raises Questions, Complaints Across Boston Area

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Dukakis Center Associate Director Stephanie Pollack moderated a discussion about winter weather and transportation in Boston on WBUR.

The Boston Globe – A 21st-century bus system

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Stephanie Pollack, associate director of the Dukakis Center for Urban and Regional Policy, suggests an innovative idea for better bus service in Boston.

CommonWealth Magazine – A troubling transit trend line

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Stephanie Pollack, Associate Director of Research for the Dukakis Center, says the MBTA needs to upgrade equipment and to market to new riders if suburbanites are to choose rails over roads.

Data tells a compelling story

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By Matt Collette | Northeastern News | June 24, 2013

The jour­nal­ists behind The Boston Globe’s “68 Blocks” series, which takes an in-​​depth look at life in the city’s Bowdoin-​​Geneva neigh­bor­hood, knew they wanted hard data to play a key role in their work. But they didn’t want the series to read like a run­down of facts and fig­ures, according to Steve Wilmsen, enter­prise editor for the Globe’s Metro sec­tion. “We wanted it to seem like a story,” he said.

Wilmsen and a team of Globe jour­nal­ists behind the series served as the keynote speakers at this year’s Data Day, an event held on Northeastern’s campus Friday and orga­nized by the Mass­a­chu­setts Area Plan­ning Council, the Boston Indi­ca­tors Project, and the School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs. Their panel dis­cus­sion on how data fig­ured into the ground­breaking series kicked off a day of events for pol­i­cy­makers, researchers, and advo­cates aimed at teaching them how data can help guide and inform better public policy.

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Massachusetts Plan Starts Small for Big Upgrade to Rail System

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By KATHARINE Q. SEELYE | The New York Times

BOSTON — Later this spring, Bostonians eager to flee to Cape Cod for the weekend will have an option other than sitting in bumper-to-bumper traffic for 70 miles and fuming along with everyone else.

Starting May 24, they can hop a train to Hyannis, where regional buses, ferries and rental cars will await to whisk them out to the beaches, islands and wind-swept dunes.

The train, the first passenger service to the cape since 1995, is one small piece of a major $13 billion transportation overhaul envisioned by Gov. Deval Patrick. That overhaul is aimed chiefly at repairing and upgrading worn-out bridges, roads and commuter lines in Massachusetts, but about 20 percent of it would go toward reviving train service to the cape and elsewhere in the state.

Mr. Patrick said that upgrading these in-state routes would spur economic development. It would also provide important links for Amtrak’s long-range plans to establish high-speed train service throughout New England. Read More

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