Our Work

The Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Project (CRRJ) conducts research and supports policy initiatives on anti-civil rights violence in the United States and other miscarriages of justice of that period. CRRJ serves as a resource for scholars, policymakers, and organizers involved in various initiatives seeking justice for crimes of the civil rights era.

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Application for Legal Fellowship with CRRJ

Application: Legal Fellowship with

The Civil Rights & Restorative Justice Project

The Civil Rights & Restorative Justice Project (CRRJ) at Northeastern University School of Law is looking for a legal fellow to work with the project over the next two years

The Project:

CRRJ, an internationally known University-based program, engages lawyers, researchers, journalists and advocates in human rights, civil rights, criminal justice, and restorative justice in projects relating to racial violence in the United States in the mid-twentieth century. Building on the lessons of the civil rights cold case initiative, CRRJ compiles and analyzes information about racial violence, and pursues legal proceedings and law reform to redress these wrongs. CRRJ houses the nation’s most extensive archive on racially-motivated homicides. It works closely with communities to create unique restorative programs to honor the lives of unknown citizens who were killed for choosing to live free of racial oppression. The homicide victims whose cases we take on were killed because they defied racial norms, or claimed the right to vote, to operate a business, or to walk on the sidewalk. Our docket includes cases from 1930 to 1970.


CRRJ is one of the most prominent projects applying the tools of transitional and restorative justice in the United States. CRRJ assists communities seeking truth processes, memorialization, official apologies, and formal legal redress. Graduate students in law and journalism at Northeastern University and Southern University undertake the casework.

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CRRJ 2014 Year End Report

The Civil Rights and Restorative Justice Project at Northeastern University School of Law brings together lawmakers, lawyers, activists, researchers, journalists and the families of victims of racial homicides to study and redress the systemic failures of the criminal justice system of the mid-twentieth century. We engage in a form of legal archeology: recovering documents lost to history, examining the fault lines of each case, and conceptualizing continuities over time. Our students interview witnesses and family members, document their memories, and share official accounts of the events. CRRJ maintains the most comprehensive archive on racial homicides in the country, including records of law enforcement, civil rights groups, and state and federal courts, as well as images and oral histories.

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Latest News

Alabama’s Jim Crow era murders under new spotligh...

MOBILE, Alabama -- A number of grisly racially-motivated killings that occurred in Alabama during the Jim Crow era are getting a fresh look. The Civil Rights & Restorative Justice Project, a group ...

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